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Whether you begin your trek at a roadhead or fly into a remote mountain airstrip, a large part of it will be in the Middle Hills region at elevations between 500 and 3000 metres. In this region, there are always well-developed trails through villages and across mountain passes.

Even at high altitudes there are intermittent settlements used during summer by shepherds, so the trails, though often indistinct, are always there.

You can easily travel on any trail without the aid of ropes or mountaineering skills. There are rare occasions when there is snow on the trail, and on some high passes it might be necessary to place a safety line for your companions or porters if there is deep snow. Still, alpine techniques are almost never used on a traditional trek. Anyone who has walked extensively in the mountains has all the skills necessary for an extended trek in Nepal.


A Trek Requires Physical Effort

A trek is physically demanding because of its length and the almost unbelievable changes in elevation. During the 300-km trek from Jiri to Everest base camp and return, for example, the trail gains and loses more than 9000 metres of elevation during many steep ascents and descents. On most treks, the daily gain is less than 800 metres in about 15 km, though ascents of as much as 1200 metres are possible on some days.

You can always take plenty of time during the day to cover this distance, so the physical exertion, though quite strenuous at times, is not sustained. You also can stop frequently and take plenty of time for rest.

Most popular treks in Nepal

Annapurna Circuit Trekking, Annapurna Base Camp Trekking, Jomsom Trekking, Ghorepani Trekking, Everest Base Camp Trekking, Everest Kalapattar Trekking, Gokyo Lake Trekking, Gokyo Cholapass EBC Trekking, Gosaikunda Trekking, Manaslu Trekking, Upper Mustang Trekking